What? Malik Obama

I’d heard something about this before, but hadn’t taken the time to look it up. Apparently, our former President, The Obammesiah’s half brother is a Trump supporter. This is his Twitter account:

Though I spend little time on Twitter anymore (I focus on Gab.ai), I decided to follow him.

I got this idea through this article, in which Malik released a photocopy of his half-brother’s Kenyan birth certificate.

In 2011, I read Jerome Corsi’s “Where’s The Birth Certificate?” There was a LOT of our former President’s past that did not entirely add up. I’ve come across several accounts, some decently documented, that the former President’s real father was Communist Frank Marshal Davis. His mother was affiliated with Davis, around the time she could have been impregnated by the commie. Barack Obama Sr. was some poor foreign student who was brought in to marry Stanley to create some legitimacy. It’s interesting, anyway.

I Never Understood Fake Reviews

I don’t get why people post fake reviews. I barely understand negative reviews. I think I’ve posted one on Amazon. I posted a couple more on my old blog, but I’d been asked by the publishers to review the books, I didn’t think they were good, and did my duty to factually explain why. Generally, if I don’t like or agree with something, I move on.

But if you’re a popular alt-right or conservative figure, and you write or publish books, you’re going to get negative reviews. The people who leave them have obviously never read the books or used the products (Vox Day links a negative review of Ivanka’s perfume).

But, mindless, intellectually dishonest SJW’s, your anonymity is no longer a protection. Vox Day included some interesting text at the bottom of his post I linked above:

And VFM, let’s find out who this Linux-using, dog-owning David is. Can you beat your previous time of 57 minutes to provide name, education, and place of employment? It was really rather amusing to give the previous gentleman a call at his office and ask him what it was that he didn’t like about the book. I don’t think “shell-shocked” would be too strong a word to describe his reaction. Sadly, he lived in a state where it was necessary to have permission to record the call.

That’s right, SJWs. Leave a negative review of one of Castalia House’s products, and the VFM (Vile Faceless Minions) may find you, and you may get a call from Vox Day (possibly at your place of work) himself asking you what you didn’t like. And no matter how polite and cordial Vox is, your amygdalas won’t be able to handle it because you’re cowards. Otherwise, you wouldn’t be afraid of a book.

Ryan Holiday’s $139 Book

I’m glad to see Ryan Holiday is back. He went through a phase of liberal butthurt after the election, and the quality of his posts dropped dramatically. I found them unreadable for the last month and a half or so.

He explains why he dropped $139 on a book. And why you should too, if you want the book and it adds value to your life. As for “I don’t have time to read?” Here’s Ryan:

Fuck you, you don’t have time to read. You’re reading this article aren’t you? You checked Facebook this morning. And Twitter. You went to your work’s Christmas party and you’ve seen at least one episode of Game of Thrones. You have time. Money? There is always money for the things that are important. There is always a way.

Guilty of all, except I’ve never watched Game of Thrones. I have a rule about culture. If something is so popular that everybody is doing it, I normally don’t. I either get in early on the hype curve, or maybe come back to it after the hype has died down.Also:

A single book can unlock an idea, start a business, generate a change, seal a life decision, open you to a new perspective, prepare you for some unknown adversity that lies around a curve in the road. A single book can be worth literally millions of dollars. Or save a broken marriage. Or introduce you to something you’d never have known otherwise.

I agree with Ryan. I probably have more books than I’ll ever be able to read in my lifetime, and they keep adding up. But I’ve read some that did change my life, give me a new perspective, or give me a new direction. I’ve also had to learn that some books suck, and it’s OK to put it down and move on.

Book Review: Fight The Rooster by Nick Cole

At some point in the past, I got on Nick Cole’s mailing list for Advanced Review Copies (ARCs) of his books. I still owe him a review for Ctrl+Alt+Revolt.
Fight The Rooster showed up in my email a couple weeks ago. I started reading it. It’s my first Nick Cole book, and it will not be my last, that’s for sure.
Fight The Rooster is billed as a book about a director who decides the only way to save his life it to ruin his movie. He wants to deliberately wreck it so he can escape Hollywood.
But despite every attempt he makes, the movie will not be ruined. The actors work hard. The old-fashioned cameraman he brings in has rediscovered his love and updated his techniques. Even the screw-up stoner brother of a great producer who comes in to cover for his brother somehow manages to pull the job off.
Though most of the characters have names, a few are never named. “The Great Director”’s name is never given, neither is his “Perfect Robot Wife” or the “Executive Vice President”.
Though the book starts out as a comedy (and it is hilarious), it turns into a dramatic redemption story. It’s the kind of story you wish you didn’t have a job or need to sleep or anything so you can finish it. Five stars for being riveting and everything a great story should be.

Not Quite A Book Review: The Confessions of Congressman X

A friend told me about the Confessions of Congressman X. I figured it was inexpensive, so I ordered the Kindle version.

Had some downtime at work, so I read it. It was a VERY quick read. Maybe too quick, especially for $5.

This “book” was billed as confessions of an inside Congressman. Supposedly, he’s a Democrat. He “tells it like it is”. I didn’t think so.

Some background: the book was compiled by a man named Robert Atkinson based on conversations he’s had over the years with a Demoncrat Congressman. He became friends with this Congressman, and would meet up when he was in DC. Over the years, he made notes of the things the Congressman said. At one point, he figured he had enough notes to make a book. The Congressman was pissed off at him for making notes, but eventually relented and told him to put a book together. He also edited the notes so the quotes are accurate. This is all detailed in the introduction to the book, written by Mr. Atkinson.

One of the newsletters I read took the book on a few weeks ago, before I read it. They couldn’t identify the Congressman, but speculated that it could have been anybody. I agree; the book is a selection of quotes centered around “chapter” themes. It’s more like a book of wisdom; proverbs of an asshole is a better description.

Confessions of Congressman X didn’t tell me anything I didn’t already know. Voters are stupid. Congressmen are more obsessed with fundraising and getting reelected than anything else, and don’t give a crap about the voters. Bills are written in secret by unaccountable committees, etc. He didn’t even touch on how lobbyists basically write the bills, although he did say Congressmen don’t read occurred

t occured to me while I was reading that this book would have been a lot better if it were written in a fake persona, like Dan Lyons’ “Fake Steve Jobs”. Now THAT was funny, but also informative.

If I haven’t bored you with the idea too much, you can buy “Confessions of Congressman X” here, from my affiliate link.