A Few Books To Help You Develop A Framework To Understand The Times

With America’s worst mass shooting in our recent past, a media that is entirely run by subversives who hate Americans (especially “conservatives”), many people wonder just what the hell is going on?

I don’t know if we’re entering “The Apocolypse”. I think we’re definitely in the 4th Turning crisis foretold by prophets Straus and Howe.

There are a few books I can recommend to help you understand the psychology of the people you’re likely to encounter in our times. Many of them I haven’t formally reviewed, although I should. You can start with The Fourth Turning, linked above.

The first book I recommend you read (after 4th Turning) is The Evolutionary Psychology Behind Politics by Anonymous Conservative. He wrote his second book under the name “Michael Trust.” He truly is anonymous beyond the point of paranoia. When Red Ice wanted to interview him, he sent Matt Forney instead. You can find AC’s blog here. I read his book in 2013, and have been reading his blog ever since. His work is truly valuable and should be archived for future generations.

The Evolutionary Psychology Behind Politics takes an old evolutionary theory commonly called r/K Theory and applies it to politics. He explains it better than I can, but the concept is simple. Different environments select for different factors. If your ancestors came from a warm climate where food was everywhere, you likely wouldn’t need a high IQ or a long time preference. If your ancestors came from a colder climate, you’d have to have a higher IQ and you’d have to adapt to be able to plan ahead; to grow and store up food for winter. A/C divides people into r (rabbits) and K (Wolves). This isn’t like the Biblical sheep and wolves; the wolves (if you are one) are the good guys in this theory.

Rabbits have no or little in-group loyalty, are conflict-averse, breed prolifically, and have little investment in child rearing. Wolves, on the other hand, have strong in-group loyalty, are bred for a world of conflict, and have high investment in breeding and offspring.

Contrast that with the difference between the average liberal and conservative in the world and you’ll see where this fits in.

As a bonus, read his second book: How To Deal With Narcissists. In it, he explains what a narcissist is, why they are that way, and how to avoid them or deal with them if you must. This also explains a lot about how our world works and how the people who run it operate. Chances are, you know a few narcissists. This may help you a lot. It definitely helped me understand a few people I’ve been around.

Next up is SJWs Always Lie by Vox Day. He explains what an SJW is, what “The Narrative” is, how they operate, how they attack, and how to fight back. He also explains the difference between rhetoric and dialectic, and how you need to be able to operate in both. He also shows (much from personal experience) how if you are attacked by SJWs, you’re pretty much screwed as few if any will come to your aid. But never apologize, and never back down. That is blood in the water to them. His next book in the series, SJWs Always Double Down, should be out Oct 9. I pre-ordered it. SJW’s Always Lie, if read in the order I present, builds on Evolutionary Psychology and Narcissists.

Another book to aid in your understanding of our current times is Cuckservative: How “Conservatives” Betrayed America by Vox Day and John Red Eagle. If you’re a conservative and/or a Republican, and you wonder why Republican and conservative politicians always puss out and surrender, this book will explain it to you.

A few more I’ll add as sort of honorable mentions are Mike Cernovich’s Gorilla Mindset and Ivan Throne’s 9 Laws. You can’t control what happens to you, but you can control how you respond to it. Mindset is a powerful tool. Say what you will about some other aspects of Cernovich, but his book is very powerful and practical. I haven’t finished 9 Laws yet. I’m about halfway through. In the first part of the book, Throne lays out what his nine laws are, and what the dark triad is. These are mindset tools you can use to operate in and understand the world around you.

I could go back through my list of books and find some more academic, longer, harder to read ones. All of these books are easy to read, yet highly comprehensive. If you want to know more about why the people in the world are the way they are, and how to respond to or avoid them, read the books on this list.

There Will Be War, Vol 1

There Will Be War Vol I was published in 1983 and edited by Jerry Pournelle and Larry Niven. It was republished in 2015 by Castalia House. I wish I had known about this series growing up. I probably would have been all over it. Jerry Pournelle recently passed away, and I’m sorry to say I haven’t read any of his work during his actual lifetime.

I wish I had known about this series growing up. I probably would have been all over it. I grew up as an Air Force brat during the Cold War. From 1980 to 1985, my dad was stationed at Ramstein Air Base in what used to be West Germany. We lived with the fact that Soviet bombers could be overhead before they could get the air raid sirens lit off.

Hell, I was walking to school in 1983 when some terrorists somehow got a truckload of explosives onto Ramstein and detonated them at Headquarters. I felt the shockwave from the blast. My mom was freaking out all day, since my dad didn’t have a chance to call.

I’m somewhat sympathetic to Cold War literature. I also greatly enjoy military science fiction, having spent most of my life in or around the military in some capacity, from dependent to active duty to reservist to defense contractor and direct civilian employee.

The There Will Be War series involves military science fiction short stories, essays, and articles collected and edited by Jerry Pournelle. He writes of science fiction conventions attended by serious military and science fiction writers, not a bunch of SJW degenerates like those of today.

Growing up, I knew of the doctrine of “Mutually Assured Destruction” or MAD. In this book, I learned of another doctrine called “Assured Survival”. MAD didn’t like the concept of civil defense, while Assured Survival depended on it. I’d also never heard of the THOR system either.

I think my favorite story was the satirical “The Battle”, by Robert Sheckly. This story could easily have been part of a South Park episode.

The original novella for “Ender’s Game” is included. That story has evolved quite a bit. I reviewed it on my Blogspot blog, and I’ve been meaning to repost it here. Orson Scott Card is an amazing writer.

While I’ve seen several movies based on Philip K. Dick’s books, the first story of his I’ve actually read is in There Will Be War Vol 1, “The Defenders”. Very interesting concept.

I’m going to have to make my way through the rest of the series.

One problem I’m finding with short stories though, and I’ve only read a handful of anthologies, is that you’re dropped into the middle of a story with no context. Then you’re trying to figure out the answers to questions such as “Who the hell are these people?” “Why are they using horses if this is science fiction?” And by the time you finally figure out what the hell is going on, identify with the characters and want them to succeed, it’s over.

Book Review: Hitler In Hell by Martin Van Creveld

Nazis are becoming all the rage lately. From the left calling anybody to the right of Karl Marx “Nazi” or “fascist” to a group of people commonly referred to as the “alt-reich” or alt-retards, you see and hear it all over the place. President Trump, since the early days of his campaign, has been called “literally Hitler”.

In light of that, I’ve been doing my own research into the subject. I’ve read Mein Kampf (Ford translation) and several other books trying to get a handle on what actually happened so I don’t become one of these historically illiterate idiots running around.

Back in June, Castalia House released Martin Van Creveld’s latest book, Hitler In Hell. I got a free copy as a member of their book club (joining is as easy as submitting your email address.) It took me a while to read it since I had an ePub on my phone. I finally finished.

As I read the book, I kept wondering “why would an Israeli Jew write a book that seems to come out favorable to the Fuhrer?” The answer is at the back. Van Creveld has studied the subject his entire life. He had family that both survived and perished during the events of WWII and the concentration camps (commonly called “The Holocaust.”) He has read many of the biographies and done plenty of archival research, and as a military historian, has done plenty of his own reading and writing on German military tactics in both wars.

Van Creveld has always thought about writing a biography on the man but didn’t know what to add that others hadn’t already covered. Then it hit him, to write the book autobiographical. So although this book is fiction, it is written as if in Hitler’s own words and voice.

The premise of the book is: Hitler is in Hell. He’s totally conscious of the events since he ate a bullet in his bunker (he has an Internet connection), and is writing both his side of the story and responding to his critics.

I enjoyed the book and learned a lot in the process. In some ways, it agrees with “alternative historians” such is Mike King. In a few other ways, it differs. Some claim Hitler let the British escape at Dunkirk. Van Creveld’s Hitler says it was flawed intelligence and ground that prevented his army from moving quickly enough.

All in all, Hitler in Hell is a great read and a valuable addition to this historical discussion. The story of Hitler is not one as simple as “evil man!” or “demon possessed”. He was a real man with real motivations at a real point in history with real influences, both positive and negative. He was a combat soldier, serving at the front for almost four years, wounded in action twice, then watched helplessly as his nation was humiliated and raped with the Treaty of Versailles. He was also an intelligent man and a scholar, who read a lot, often a book a day. What would you do?

Book Review: Derelict: Marines Saga by Paul Cooley

I think I came across and bought Derelict: Marines from a BookBub newsletter. The story sounded interesting, so I bought it. And it was so good, I bought the second book, Derelict: Tomb. Now I’m stuck and left hanging until the 3rd book comes out later this year.

This series is military science fiction. The premise of the series is that a ship sent on a mission about 50 years go that lost contact suddenly shows up near Pluto mysteriously. This has sort of an “Event Horizon” vibe. A group of search and rescue Marines stationed near Neptune is dispatched to check it out. Their orders are to board the ship, recover any logs they can, and tow it back.

But the AIs they’re dealing with start giving them conflicting information. Their ship’s AI starts acting strange. While they were ordered to tow the ship back, the AIs suggest destroying it.

Then they find some strange objects on the ship that look like pinecones, as well as some liquid that kills a Marine who steps in it. While mounting thrusters to stabilize the ship’s spin, a fireteam’s skiff is disabled, forcing them to take refuge inside the ship. Low on air and with an injured Marine in serious need of medical care, they are forced to find a way to survive and defend against the strange objects, which turn out to be some form of extra-solar life, which certainly isn’t looking to share their wisdom and technology with residents of the Sol system.

These are fast paced, action packed books that will keep you on the edge of your seat. And damn it, I have to wait until at least October before the 3rd book comes out.

While it’s really hard to capture life in space without taking some artistic license (the author uses “grav plating” for artificial gravity), the military aspects are fairly realistic. I assumed when I started reading the books that the author had been a Marine, but nothing in his bio indicates military service. Still, he did a decent job.

One hint as to how well an author renders Marines is how their rank is described. While it’s perfectly acceptable to call ANY NCO in the Army or Chair Force a “sergeant”, that doesn’t fly in the Marines. Their mentality is that you earned it, and you deserve to be addressed by it. There is only one sergeant in the Marines, which is E-5. Once you make E-6, you are a Staff Sergeant, and can expect to be addressed by it. Gunnery Sergeants (E-7s) are often addressed as “Gunny”, which is acceptable. But NOBODY calls a Gunny a sergeant. That doesn’t fly.

I’m not even sure if it’s acceptable to call a Private First Class a Private.

What? Malik Obama

I’d heard something about this before, but hadn’t taken the time to look it up. Apparently, our former President, The Obammesiah’s half brother is a Trump supporter. This is his Twitter account:

Though I spend little time on Twitter anymore (I focus on Gab.ai), I decided to follow him.

I got this idea through this article, in which Malik released a photocopy of his half-brother’s Kenyan birth certificate.

In 2011, I read Jerome Corsi’s “Where’s The Birth Certificate?” There was a LOT of our former President’s past that did not entirely add up. I’ve come across several accounts, some decently documented, that the former President’s real father was Communist Frank Marshal Davis. His mother was affiliated with Davis, around the time she could have been impregnated by the commie. Barack Obama Sr. was some poor foreign student who was brought in to marry Stanley to create some legitimacy. It’s interesting, anyway.

I Never Understood Fake Reviews

I don’t get why people post fake reviews. I barely understand negative reviews. I think I’ve posted one on Amazon. I posted a couple more on my old blog, but I’d been asked by the publishers to review the books, I didn’t think they were good, and did my duty to factually explain why. Generally, if I don’t like or agree with something, I move on.

But if you’re a popular alt-right or conservative figure, and you write or publish books, you’re going to get negative reviews. The people who leave them have obviously never read the books or used the products (Vox Day links a negative review of Ivanka’s perfume).

But, mindless, intellectually dishonest SJW’s, your anonymity is no longer a protection. Vox Day included some interesting text at the bottom of his post I linked above:

And VFM, let’s find out who this Linux-using, dog-owning David is. Can you beat your previous time of 57 minutes to provide name, education, and place of employment? It was really rather amusing to give the previous gentleman a call at his office and ask him what it was that he didn’t like about the book. I don’t think “shell-shocked” would be too strong a word to describe his reaction. Sadly, he lived in a state where it was necessary to have permission to record the call.

That’s right, SJWs. Leave a negative review of one of Castalia House’s products, and the VFM (Vile Faceless Minions) may find you, and you may get a call from Vox Day (possibly at your place of work) himself asking you what you didn’t like. And no matter how polite and cordial Vox is, your amygdalas won’t be able to handle it because you’re cowards. Otherwise, you wouldn’t be afraid of a book.

Ryan Holiday’s $139 Book

I’m glad to see Ryan Holiday is back. He went through a phase of liberal butthurt after the election, and the quality of his posts dropped dramatically. I found them unreadable for the last month and a half or so.

He explains why he dropped $139 on a book. And why you should too, if you want the book and it adds value to your life. As for “I don’t have time to read?” Here’s Ryan:

Fuck you, you don’t have time to read. You’re reading this article aren’t you? You checked Facebook this morning. And Twitter. You went to your work’s Christmas party and you’ve seen at least one episode of Game of Thrones. You have time. Money? There is always money for the things that are important. There is always a way.

Guilty of all, except I’ve never watched Game of Thrones. I have a rule about culture. If something is so popular that everybody is doing it, I normally don’t. I either get in early on the hype curve, or maybe come back to it after the hype has died down.Also:

A single book can unlock an idea, start a business, generate a change, seal a life decision, open you to a new perspective, prepare you for some unknown adversity that lies around a curve in the road. A single book can be worth literally millions of dollars. Or save a broken marriage. Or introduce you to something you’d never have known otherwise.

I agree with Ryan. I probably have more books than I’ll ever be able to read in my lifetime, and they keep adding up. But I’ve read some that did change my life, give me a new perspective, or give me a new direction. I’ve also had to learn that some books suck, and it’s OK to put it down and move on.

Book Review: Fight The Rooster by Nick Cole

At some point in the past, I got on Nick Cole’s mailing list for Advanced Review Copies (ARCs) of his books. I still owe him a review for Ctrl+Alt+Revolt.
Fight The Rooster showed up in my email a couple weeks ago. I started reading it. It’s my first Nick Cole book, and it will not be my last, that’s for sure.
Fight The Rooster is billed as a book about a director who decides the only way to save his life it to ruin his movie. He wants to deliberately wreck it so he can escape Hollywood.
But despite every attempt he makes, the movie will not be ruined. The actors work hard. The old-fashioned cameraman he brings in has rediscovered his love and updated his techniques. Even the screw-up stoner brother of a great producer who comes in to cover for his brother somehow manages to pull the job off.
Though most of the characters have names, a few are never named. “The Great Director”’s name is never given, neither is his “Perfect Robot Wife” or the “Executive Vice President”.
Though the book starts out as a comedy (and it is hilarious), it turns into a dramatic redemption story. It’s the kind of story you wish you didn’t have a job or need to sleep or anything so you can finish it. Five stars for being riveting and everything a great story should be.

Not Quite A Book Review: The Confessions of Congressman X

A friend told me about the Confessions of Congressman X. I figured it was inexpensive, so I ordered the Kindle version.

Had some downtime at work, so I read it. It was a VERY quick read. Maybe too quick, especially for $5.

This “book” was billed as confessions of an inside Congressman. Supposedly, he’s a Democrat. He “tells it like it is”. I didn’t think so.

Some background: the book was compiled by a man named Robert Atkinson based on conversations he’s had over the years with a Demoncrat Congressman. He became friends with this Congressman, and would meet up when he was in DC. Over the years, he made notes of the things the Congressman said. At one point, he figured he had enough notes to make a book. The Congressman was pissed off at him for making notes, but eventually relented and told him to put a book together. He also edited the notes so the quotes are accurate. This is all detailed in the introduction to the book, written by Mr. Atkinson.

One of the newsletters I read took the book on a few weeks ago, before I read it. They couldn’t identify the Congressman, but speculated that it could have been anybody. I agree; the book is a selection of quotes centered around “chapter” themes. It’s more like a book of wisdom; proverbs of an asshole is a better description.

Confessions of Congressman X didn’t tell me anything I didn’t already know. Voters are stupid. Congressmen are more obsessed with fundraising and getting reelected than anything else, and don’t give a crap about the voters. Bills are written in secret by unaccountable committees, etc. He didn’t even touch on how lobbyists basically write the bills, although he did say Congressmen don’t read occurred

t occured to me while I was reading that this book would have been a lot better if it were written in a fake persona, like Dan Lyons’ “Fake Steve Jobs”. Now THAT was funny, but also informative.

If I haven’t bored you with the idea too much, you can buy “Confessions of Congressman X” here, from my affiliate link.